A productive day

This morning, I set a batch of chutney going, using the apples from our tree. It’s been slowly brewing for hours now, so soon I will have to go and jar it up.

I’ve also discovered I can use my pyrography tool as a hot stencil cutter, so I cut the stencils in much quicker time and better detail than I was expecting. It’s hard to photograph clear plastic, so the best thing I could think of was to hang them on my washing line:

Honeysuckle, comfrey, ivy.


Bumble bee, lavender,  apple blossom, chives.

I also cut positive and negative stamps of the bee, apple, ivy, and comfrey.


And blocked the Turner’s Hill TV tower piece.

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Blocking

I’ve got two quilts which are both ready to mount (Moka Pots and Bumble Hole) and so this morning I have pinned them both out on my blocking board, so they are both really flat when it comes to mounting them.

Hilary taught me to block pieces, and it’s well worth doing. You need a flat surface the size of your piece, a water spray, pins, and a finger that doesn’t mind getting a divot in the end of it!

I found a tub of map pins part way through blocking the second piece – they really are much better, as the short shaft means you can apply more pressure without them bending.


Here’s the Moka Pots – a little too big for my blocking board, but the end which is hanging off isn’t very distorted, so hopefully it’ll be ok. My blocking board is a 4ft office divider screen I got when my work were having a clear out. It’s easy to pin into, stable, so I can put some force into pinning, and stands in front of my shelves when not in use, so doesn’t get in the way much.

Moka Pots is being entered into the West Country Quilt and Textile Show next month, assuming they got my form in time, so I need to get it mounted and ready to post soon. Not too sure how I am going to post it, as it is 40″ by 20″ (1m by 50 cm).


Because the board is double sided, I can block two pieces at once. Bumble Hole is A3 sized, and I was worried about blocking it, as the crackle and butterfly prints are both on deli paper. Deli paper is a US version of greaseproof paper, and is excellent for printing on (unlike UK greaseproof, which is rubbish), but I was worried it would tear if it was pinned and stretched. Thankfully no tears, just slightly damp feet where the water rolled off!